Can You Eat Oatmeal If You Have Diabetes?

0
1339
eat oatmeal if you have diabetes

Oatmeal is a great breakfast food. And, everyone knows it is healthy for you. But, can you eat oatmeal if you have diabetes? The answer isn’t a simple one.

Oatmeal Overview

You know what oatmeal is. You probably grew up eating it. Or, maybe see your grandparents eating it. It’s been around for a very long time.

Oatmeal is oat kernels that have the husks taken off. These oat groats are steel cut, chopped, or rolled. And, you may see many “instant” oatmeal varieties, too. It’s usually cooked in a liquid and served warm. Furthermore, you can add different types of toppings like fruit, nuts, and sweeteners.

If you are diabetic, oatmeal may already be familiar to you since it has a low GI or glycemic index. Eating this can help you maintain your blood sugar levels. It may also reduce the insulin amounts you need, as well as help with cardiovascular health.

Oatmeal Benefits

Eating oatmeal can help in the following ways:

  • Reducing amount of insulin injections needed
  • Help level glucose levels
  • Improve heart-health and lowers cholesterol
  • Helps with weight management due to high fiber
  • Regulates digestion
  • Excellent source of energy

There aren’t a lot of drawbacks from eating oatmeal. But, some negative effects can include increased gassiness and bloating because of high fiber content.

Eating Oatmeal: The Diabetic Way

  • Add flavor with berries, nuts, or cinnamon
  • Steel-cut or Irish oats are best
  • Cook in water or low-fat milk
  • Add a protein or another healthy fat to help glucose levels

Lastly, remember to stay away from foods you normally would as a diabetic anyways. That includes: too much sweetener or dried fruits, and cream or whole milk. In addition, the instant or prepackaged oatmeal packets may be flavorful, but they are also packed with things you don’t want as a diabetic.

Final Thoughts

Yes, you can eat oatmeal if you have diabetes so long as you make smart choices. Keep an eye on your portion size. And, watch what you add into it.

Previous

Are Type 2 Diabetes and Cancer Related?

The years leading up to a diabetes diagnosis are a whirlwind of illness and confusion for some, and seem entirely benign for others. Some men ... Read more

Next

Is Chiropractic Care Another Step in Fighting Diabetes?

Chiropractic care often comes with both naysayers and firm believers. Some tout this form of medicine as a miracle worker, while other suggest it is ... Read more